Monthly Archives: October 2013

Week 7

Let’s start with my goof – appositives.  A nice (and correct) example of appositives and how to diagram them is on p. 120.  An appositive is a noun (or pn) directly beside another noun which explains or identifies it.  For more information on appositives, see Our Mother Tongue lesson 15.
Noun of Direct Address – the person or thing that is being directly spoken to.  They are set off with commas, and diagrammed above the subject – in the same spot an interjection would be diagrammed.
note:  if you want a compound imperative sentence, NDAs must be used to clarify different subjects.   (See sentence #1 and #3 on p. 127.)
Adverbs – We learned a song for the definition of an adverb and the adverb questions.  (Itsy-bitsy spider)  See the adverb chart.   Commit this to memory!  Knowing those AV questions will help as our sentences get more complicated.  Check out the middle of p. 122 for examples of when an AV modifies an adjective or another AV.  Also, check out the top of p. 123 where it gives examples of how adverbs answer each of the adverb questions.  Copy, copy, copy the adverb chart.
Imperative, compound, s-vt-do:  We continued working with transitive verbs and direct objects and put them with an imperative purpose.  We talked about how the mood and person of the verb changes when the purpose is changed from declarative to imperative.  Practice analyzing and diagramming the sentences in the back of the lesson.
Math:  we will be playing with the 13s next week.  This usually requires time and diligence to learn!
Writing:  Vocab seems to be coming along nicely.  It is great to see them using and learning these words.  Great job!  We checked to see if their paragraphs had a topic sentence and a clincher.  Great job again!  We did the KWO for the second paragraph about Vikings being Explorers.  Students will write the second paragraph and then write an introductory sentence and a final clincher to tie the 2 or 3 paragraphs together.  We quickly reviewed the 2 sentence openers #3 and #6.  Check their final drafts with the checklist on p. 61.

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Filed under Essentials

Week 6

EEL
New stuff:
I introduced conjunctions.
Coordinating Conjunctions – FANBOYS – connect grammatically equal words, phrases, or clauses.  ex. 2 subjects or 2 verbs or 2 direct objects or 2 clauses.
Subordinating Con. – http://www.asia.wub are the most common.  They begin dependent (subordinate) clauses.  We will see these when we do complex sentences.
Students should memorize the def. of a conjunction, the FANBOYS, and http://www.asia.wub words.  They should become familiar with relative PNs and the other words on the chart H.
We had a new sentence structure – compound!  (2 simple sentences joined by a fanboys)  We had a new sentence patter – s-vt-do.  The DO receives the action of the verb.
This week, read the lesson in the guide.  Hopefully everyone is doing this – teachers, not students.  It has a lot of information.  Work through this week’s sentences – although only #1 and #2 are basic.  Get familiar with the new question in the question confirmation.  NOTE:  In the question confirmation, there is an extra question at the end.  (“Can ______ replace or describe ______?”)  don’t worry about this question.  I will talk about that question week 9.
Copy and recopy the conjunction chart.  Read through chart G several times to get familiar with compound sentences.  If you want, just focus on the first block – declarative.  Practice other charts that need practice.
If you want more info – Our Mother Tongue is an excellent resource.  Page 60 talks about conjunctive adverbs.
IEW
Sentence Openers!  #3 is to begin a sentence with an -LY word, and #6 is a very short sentence.  Varying the way our sentences begin keeps our reading from becoming monotonous.
Read the source on p. 56 and do a KWO for the topic of Vikings – Warriors.  Try to have this first paragraph on warriors finished by week 7.  We will be doing the KWO for topic B: Explorers week 7 together in class.  If your student would like to do a 3rd paragraph, work on that during the break.  Checklists are p. 61/62.
phew!  Let me know if you have any questions.  Have a great 2 weeks!

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Filed under General

Making Connections

One of my favorite things about classical education is the integration of subjects.  Modern education keeps every subject in its own little box.  Specialized teachers know their subject well, but rarely make connections to what the student is learning in other subjects.
I distinctly remember in high school, at one time, what I was learning in history corresponded to what we were reading in English.  I remember thinking, “Wow! Isn’t this cool!”
Subject integration is something that tutors emphasize in the Challenge program (CC’s jr. high and high school program) but we can start making connections with our kids in Foundations.
Here are some quick examples.  Of course connecting geography and history is an easy one.  “What water did the warriors in the Hundred Years’ War have to cross to get to their enemy?”  If you’ve been through cycle 1, you can locate Jerusalem and discuss the journey just to get to the Crusades.  And there is at least 1 timeline card for every history sentence.
Other connections can be made this cycle are between science and history.   We will be learning that Copernicus was a great scientist – and soon, science will be focused on astronomy.  That makes for an interesting discussion (depending on the age of your student) about heliocentric evidence and the power of the church.  You could also talk about fleas and rats (the Black Plague) and what type of consumer they are and where they fit in the food chain.  What biomes are found in Europe?  Week 13 we will learn about the steam engine…we can connect that to the water cycle!
How about Latin?  It’s a great idea to point out words in our memory work that have Latin roots.  Many of our science words are Latin based!
Making connections between subjects is something I tried to start doing my 2nd year in CC.  As you are exposed to more and more memory work, things will pop into your head from other subjects and other cycles.  Memorizing the grammar is first and foremost, and then start connecting those pegs of grammar to each other and watch the wonder of God’s universe grow!

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